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"Math departments fail too many calculus students....

David Bressoud is a well-known mathematician who is a Professor of Mathematics at Macalester College and a former President of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA).  In this article, he advocates for colleges changing the way they teach calculus. He argues that the current model of instructor-led teaching is outdated and that even the students who pass the introductory courses in calculus are not always prepared for the higher level ones. Dr. Bressoud recommends active engagement in mathematics, which is usually referred to as “active learning.”

NSF funded a $3 million five-year project called SEMINAL, which stands for Student Engagement in Mathematics Through an Institutional Network for Active Learning. 12 public universities are working together on this project to show how active learning can be used in mathematics classes from precalculus through higher forms of calculus.

Even in 2018, I feel that calculus and related courses are seen as tough and gatekeepers for many aspiring students, whether they want to pursue STEM related education or economics and finance. In my high school, performance in calculus courses is critical to advance to the next level and to qualify for honors level courses in subjects like Physics or Computer Science. Even the Wharton @ Penn undergraduate admissions list shows the requirement to “have taken calculus during high school.”

I am fully in agreement with this article, in that we need to revamp how calculus is taught in high schools and colleges. Calculus is not seen as a very inclusive class which discourages many girls and minorities to enroll, with media as well stereotyping calculus students in a negative way. This research report from Dr. Bressoud and others does a nice job of giving a lot of details including this profound statement: “The worst preparation a student heading toward a career in science or engineering could receive is one that rushes toward accumulation of problem-solving abilities in calculus while short-changing the broader preparation needed for success beyond calculus.”


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